Buckwheat

Buckwheat

These are cereal crops related to pseudo-grain, the seeds work fine as a human food and partly to animal feed. Seeds are readily eaten by songbirds. Buckwheat introduced into the culture more than 5 thousand years ago.

Description

These are cereal crops related to pseudo-grain, the seeds work fine as a human food and partly to animal feed. Seeds are readily eaten by songbirds. Buckwheat introduced into the culture more than 5 thousand years ago. Buckwheat is the most important honey plant for many regions of Russia with light sandy loam soil. The feed base of beekeeping and honey production there largely depends on the state of buckwheat-growing. In favorable years, up to 80 kg of honey is obtained from 1 hectare of crops in areas with normal moisture (in arid regions, honey collection from buckwheat is extremely unstable). As a cross-pollinated, mainly entomophilous plant (pollinated by insects), buckwheat requires at least 2–2.5 bee families per hectare, which also provides up to 70% of seed production. Buckwheat flowers give a lot of nectar and greenish-yellow pollen. Abundant nectar production is observed during warm and humid weather in the first half of the day (in hot and dry weather, bees stop taking nectar bribes). Buckwheat honey is dark, brown with a reddish tinge, fragrant, spicy. Buckwheat is a common food product. Several varieties of cereals are known: the kernel - whole grain, large and small seeds - chopped grains, Smolensk cereal - crushed kernels. Groats for sale, which underwent hydro and heat treatment (from black to light brown), are used to make buckwheat porridge, casseroles, puddings, meatballs, soups. Buckwheat grain is ground on flour, but due to the lack of gluten, it is unsuitable for baking bread without adding ordinary flour. It’s used for pancakes, cakes and dumplings. It’s widely used as a side dish in the countries of the former USSR (as a porridge) and rarely used in Western European countries. In recent years, a slight increase in the consumption of buckwheat products in the West is associated with its use for dietary purposes. Unroasted cereals (green-grassy color), known as "green buckwheat", is considered a dietary and "healthy" product, and costs two or more times more than ordinary, processed buckwheat. It also makes cereals and other dishes. Buckwheat and it’s flour are stored for a long time period and are very suitable for storage in army warehouses, since the fats contained in them are resistant to oxidation.